Keep your travel tech simple

travel tech

in order to be a more responsible travel blogger

Picture me, sitting in rural Kenya in a cyber café. I walked here for half an hour. For days, I took notes in my notebook on what to write about in my next blog post. It’s a bit of a struggle to form the notes into an appealing post, considering the noise from the people at the busy market. But I manage to focus and mold an interesting story.

As I hover over the publish button with the cursor, the screen goes blank. Blackout!

My meditation skills were greatly tested several times. In 2009 I depended on the cyber cafés to keep friends and family updated. It’s still one of the easiest and cheapest ways.

Internet

You can check nomadlist.com for a quick overview of the coverage in big cities worldwide. When I stayed in Nairobi, we got Wi-Fi installed. Easy. But if you are travelling to rural areas, free internet access is not always guaranteed.

There are also more and more libraries, cafés, co-working spaces and hubs coming up where you can access internet.

And if you carry your laptop, you can either purchase a modem before you start the trip, or you buy it locally, once you have arrived.

Sometimes, data volumes and network cover can be shaky. I had to have my laptop run for one night straight in order to upload videos.

Phone

Once you know which format suits you, you’ll find that it can probably be filled on a smart phone. It usually makes much sense to buy a line from a local provider, which is the cheapest option in most cases. You can ask local friends about that. You can buy internet data in “bundles” like airtime, or subscribe for a regular monthly fee.

If you are in a more rural place, remember that you may not be able to charge your phone whenever you want. We don’t have electricity in our house on the Kenyan countryside. I usually take my phone to the next shop that is connected to power and pay a small fee every time I have it charged.

How to simplify your tech equipment

  1. Multifunctionality

I am a very old-school person with a very old phone that’s not smart but robust. I also have an MP3 player and two different cameras. Don’t be like me! Carry your smartphone. I’m sure it can offer all these functions in one.

  1. Combine

Get one single adapter that helps you get electricity in any country. Use headphones with an inbuilt microphone. USB chargers and cables can be combined as well.

  1. Avoid

Sometimes you may need batteries. You don’t have to carry them though. They can be bought locally.

  1. Minimise

Do you have to carry your entire external hard drive or will a flash disc do the job for the short trip? One SD card with massive storage replaces many smaller ones. You don’t need to carry the cable to connect your device with a computer or laptop. Bluetooth and card readers are your friends here.

  1. Don’t forget

To avoid losses, install antivirus programmes before you start travelling.

What are your tips for travel tech? How do you keep your loved ones updated? Let me know in the comments below!